2013 Culture-Based Education Conference
(including Moenahā Training)

July 8 - 10, 2013
Waikīkī Convention Center, O'ahu, Hawai'i

2013 CBE Conference Theme

BREAKOUT SESSIONS - DAY 1:

Presentations and descriptions are subject to change.


Monday, July 8 | 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.

Room 308A
1.1.A  Integrating Hawaiian Values and Traditions into Early Childhood Learning
June P. Tandal, Terry Nakamura
This session will examine preschool/PACT activities, share an approach, and illustrate how Hawaiian culture, values, and traditions are integrated in a curriculum.  Ideas on implementing similar activities in early childhood classrooms and strategies to involve parents and caregivers in the child’s learning will also be shared.

Room 308B
1.1.B  Practitioners' Open Forum: Sharing Wisdom Gained Through Your Experiences
Bert Klunder
This session will provide a forum for an open discussion on Nā Honua Mauli Ola (NHMO) in practical application terms for all educators and contexts. To expand collective networks, participants will share insights, practices, and ideas based on experiences incorporating NHMO in their work.

Room 307A
1.1.C  Ēulu Modular Classroom Design
John P. Onesta, Glen Kila, Christopher Olivera
This session will present the Ēulu Modular Classroom, an innovative energy neutral, learning environment designed for sustainability, affordability, constructability, performance, and Living Building. Intended as a holistic multi-purpose build/curriculum/placed-based alternative that can be applied to a range of needs for a variety of conditions. It has the ability to create ties between science, technology, culture, education, and economy in a sustainable low carbon footprint on the environment.

Room 307B
1.1.D  Pae Pōhaku Pa'a (Setting the Stones)
Darlene E. Martin, W. Mahealani Pai, Faith Hepua Kahulamu, Alton Kauahi
In this session, participants will walk with presenters as they describe the foundational structure and sequence of a cultural education effort within a resort community that simply began with the asking of permission from lineal descendants and putting the stones back of treasured wahi kūpuna. Hear of the kīpaepae steps taken, insights from lessons learned, and how these applications of the cultural education efforts in Keauhou-Kahaluʻu of North Kona, Hawaiʻi Island, may further aid your local goals for culture-based education. Engage as you're guided through a quick process to reflect upon, examine your local situation, then share any insights about your potential next steps.

Room 305A
1.1.E  Framing Curriculum Development for Culture-Based Education:  Four Complementary Models
Hal A. Schmid

In this session, participants will examine theoretical models that complement and help support the development of multicultural curriculum for culture-based education and 21st century skills.  Participants will observe and critique video clips of instructional practice, and then engage in collaborative planning focused on a contemporary, place-based issue presented in Hawai’i's DLNR's THE RAIN FOLLOWS THE FOREST.

Monday, July 8 | 12:45 – 2:00 p.m.

Room 308 A
1.2.A  Hawaiian Culture First College Prep Chemistry
Joel Truesdell
This session will share how a Chemistry curriculum was transformed to be culture, inquiry, and project-based first, while covering every standard Chemistry unit.  Participants will view a video showing culture-based learning in action as haumana raise and plant koa and examine the data showing the effect of the culture-based learning on students’ American Chemical Society National Test Scores and on their knowledge and connections to their culture as shown on the `Āina Based Education Survey.

Room 308 B
1.2.B  Pono Life Skills
Sara Ka’imipono Banks, Vale Crabbe, Elsie Ryder, Randee Golden, Laurie Kahiapo, Ikaika Lindo
This session is for anyone who is interested in strengthening the social, emotional and spiritual core of our keiki, our educators, or anyone working with Hawaiʻi’s haumāna.  A sampling of the Growing Pono Schools curriculum will be presented and available for the participants. During this workshop participants will experience a few activities and lessons facilitated by cultural educators from ALU LIKE, Inc. and staff from the Pono Schools Project. Learn how to incorporate the Native Hawaiian guiding principle of pono in everything you think, feel and do. Life’s lessons are discovered in the doing and being.

Room 307A
1.2.C  Connecting to Place, Connecting to Community:  Pathways to Excellence
Kay Fukuda, Loke Wakinekona, Tina Lopez
This session will share the effectiveness of two programs that serve students on the Waianae Coast: PALS (Program for Afterschool Literacy Support) and PLACES (Place-based Learning and Community Engagement in School). The curricular framework built around culturally relevant project work that supports students’ sense of place, curiosity for learning, sense of belonging, and the knowledge and skills to take on the stewardship of community will also be discussed.

Room 307B
1.2.D  Kāhea Loko:  The Call of the Pond – Bridging Culture, Place and Academic Rigor Through Aloha
Herb Lee, Kaholo Daguman, Sheri Fitzgerald
This session will share how a journey to restore the ancient fishpond of Waikalua Loko inspired and motivated learners through the practice of Aloha ʻĀina.  A brief description of what was learned from communities when planting and nurturing seeds of opportunities to help both Hawaiian and non-Hawaiian public education learners will be provided. As a partner in the Castle Complex “Re-design” process, experiences in a new ‘co-created community school,” with an emphasis on aligning to National Common Core Standards, will also be discussed.

Room 305A
1.2.E  E Ulu ka Maoli Ola:  Sustain Native Living
Jamie Kamailani Boyd
Need description

Room 303
1.2.F/1.3.E  Kūpuna Wisdom, Ē Ala Ē
Auntie Betty Kawohiokalani Ellis Jenkins, Babette Lilinoe Galang, Rona Rosco Rodenhurst, Walter Rodenhurst III, Kupuna Lehua Bongo, Donna Chickie Vincent
Kūpuna elders have long held the kuleana of traditional knowledge, culture keepers as well as living repositories and teachers of our foundational values. In this double session, participants will learn about Hawaiian values determined by kūpuna and levels of kūpuna at the first annual ‘Aha Kūpuna in 1987.  Participants will explore Kūpuna wisdom in the context of these values and experience the values through hands-on activities led by Kūpuna and mākua oʻo. Kūpuna, mākua oʻo, teachers, administrators, and program developers who wish to include kūpuna in their schools, and programs are invited to participate.
[Double Session – Continued through 2:15 pm session]


Monday, July 8 | 2:15 – 3:30 p.m.

Room 308 A
1.3.A  E Ola Ka ‘Ike Ku’una, I Ola Kākou
Pelehonuamea Harman, Kekoa L. Harman
This session will share the importance of preserving the traditional practices, the spirituality, the behaviors, and the language of hula through forms of oli (chanting), mele (singing), and the expression of manaʻo or thought through movement.  ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, coupled with movement, rhythm and sound is a strong instrument for expressing and imprinting values, teachings, and histories and connecting humanity with the past, present and future.

Room 308 B
1.3.B  Aligning Common Core to Hawaiian World View through Place-based Inquiry
Faylene Mahina Duarte, Anuhea Awo-Chun, Bonnie Kahapea
This session will provide an overview of Hālau Kū Mana’s curricula mapping process which is driven by reinforcing kānaka relationships and a sense of responsibility to place.  Three example curricular templates and a suggested planning framework will be shared and participants will be given time to work and adapt their own place-based inquiry maps.

Room 307A
1.3.C  He Ki’ina Haku Mo’oha’awina E Ola Ai Nā Pahuhopu Ho’ona’auao Kai’ōlelo Mauli Ola Hawai’i
Ke’alohi M. Reppun
Presented in Hawaiian Language.  This session will discuss the main ideas proposed in the Masterʻs paper called He Kiʻina Haku Moʻohaʻawina E Ola Ai Nā Pahuhopu Hoʻonaʻauao Kaia ʻōlelo Mauli Ola Hawaiʻi. A 10-step process for curriculum development will be outlined and a sample curriculum developed through this process will be discussed. The presenter will show how formal standards may be utilized as a starting point, Ke Kumu Honua Mauli Ola/Nā Honua Mauli Ola as guiding principles and the Moenahā structure as a template for developing classroom-level curriculum which strengthens students’ mauli Hawaiʻi and provides for learning to become more fundamentally utilitarian.

Room 307B
1.3.D  Cultural Relevance to STEM
Keolani L. Noa
This session will focus on the critical effort to increase the recruitment and retention of Native Hawaiians in diverse STEM professions. Native Hawaiians have unique, vested generational interests in cultivating scientific knowledge to preserve and promote the unique biological and cultural resources of Hawaii.

Room 303
1.2.F/1.3.E  Kūpuna Wisdom, Ē Ala Ē
Auntie Betty Kawohiokalani Ellis Jenkins, Babette Lilinoe Galang, Rona Rosco Rodenhurst, Walter Rodenhurst III, Kupuna Lehua Bongo, Donna Chickie Vincent
Kūpuna elders have long held the kuleana of traditional knowledge, culture keepers as well as living repositories and teachers of our foundational values. In this double session, participants will learn about Hawaiian values determined by kūpuna and levels of kūpuna at the first annual ‘Aha Kūpuna in 1987.  Participants will explore Kūpuna wisdom in the context of these values and experience the values through hands-on activities led by Kūpuna and mākua oʻo. Kūpuna, mākua oʻo, teachers, administrators, and program developers who wish to include kūpuna in their schools, and programs are invited to participate.
[Double Session – Continued from 12:45 pm session]

 


Monday, July 8 | 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Room 308 A
Kamehameha Schools 2015 and Beyond
Dr. Shawn Kana’iaupuni and Amy Kalili
Kamehameha Schools is seeking to engage Native Hawaiian focused educators and practitioners to discuss educational trends to help inform strategic planning for 2015 - 2030. Please join this discussion focused on envisioning a vibrant lāhui Hawai‘i in the next 30 years and identifying pathways to get there collectively.

Refreshments and pupus will be provided.



 

 

 

Kamehameha Schools Seal